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Thread: Sitting Up With the Dead: Lost Appalachian Burial Customs

  1. #1
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    Sitting Up With the Dead: Lost Appalachian Burial Customs

    Here's an article that people might find an interesting read.

    Appalachian folks are no stranger to death. For the Dark Horseman visited so frequently, houses were made with two front doors. One door was used for happy visits and the other door, known as the funeral door, would open into the deathwatch room for sitting up with the dead. Prior to the commercialization of the funeral industry, funeral homes and public cemeteries were virtually nonexistent in the early days of the Appalachian settlers.
    http://www.candidslice.com/sitting-u...urial-customs/

  2. #2
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    That's a very interesting article Monsno.
    I'M RICH! MITCH!

  3. #3
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    That was a very good article.

    As I read, I noticed traditions my family does, though we are not from the area. However, my Dad's side is Irish and similar customs are presented.

    Sadly, this past September a very dear friend of mine passed away. I remember (barely, I was such an emotional mess) different items placed in and around his casket. A can of Pepsi (his favorite drink), a candy bar, bandanas, and a few other trinkets that family and friends were leaving for him.
    It's been minutes, it's been days. It's been all that I remember. <3

  4. #4
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    These traditions of sitting up with the dead go back to the native tribes of the area, though as these traditions did inter-mix with Scotts-Irish and German folk-practices, I'm sure they had similar views.
    You'd protect the bodies from certain entities and practitioner of a malicious nature which would feed on memories , and other shades or remnants.

    it is Cherokee custom to do the same,
    To work protective medicine and to fast before and after going to a place of burial.
    Tsalagi Nvwoti Didahnvwesgi Ale Didahnesesgi
    (Cherokee medicine practitioner of left and right hand paths)
    anikutani.stfu-kthx.net - The Anikutani Tradition

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